HWN: The BIG BOYS of Storm Spotting!

Discussion in 'Skywarn Storm Spotting' started by DoctorZ, Mar 14, 2014.

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What's your favorite severe storm?

  1. Tornado

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  2. Hurricane

    33.3%
  3. Derecho

    33.3%
  4. Severe Thunderstorm

    33.3%
  5. Large Hail

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  6. Flash Flooding

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  7. Blizzard

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  8. Dust Storm

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  9. Ice Storm

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  10. Other

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  1. DoctorZ

    DoctorZ Moderator Staff Member

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    If you like storm spotting or storm chasing, then you've got to have a lot of respect for the volunteers who participate in the Hurricane Watch Net. This is SkyWarn on steroids! These guys don't take cover when the storm hits, they stay put and relay in storm reports in real time! They have a few more "Reportable Conditions" as well. And don't think that their NCS has it any easier. HWN NCS's are expected to put in several continuous hours at a time for each shift. You must also have a General Class Amateur License or better because NCS operate on the HF 20-Meter Band to relay reports. Here is a detailed description from the HWN Web Site: http://hwn.org/

    The Hurricane Watch Net consists of a group of licensed Amateur Radio Operators trained and organized to provide essential communications support to the National Hurricane Center during times of Hurricane emergencies. Our primary mission is to disseminate tropical cyclone advisory information to island communities in the Caribbean, Central America, along the Atlantic seaboard of the U.S., and throughout the Gulf of Mexico coastal areas. We also collect observed or measured weather data from amateur radio operators in the storm affected area as well as any post storm damage, and convey that information to the Hurricane Forecasters in the National Hurricane Center via the amateur radio station in the center (WX4NHC).

    The Hurricane Watch Net is a group of approximately 40 amateur radio operators strategically disbursed from across North America, throughout the Caribbean Sea, and Central America. We are not housed in a single location, as some of our followers believe; rather, we are located such that we can provide a continuous path of communications from storm-affected areas to the forecasters in the National Hurricane Center in Miami.

    The HWN is very selective about who can become a contributing member, but they are currently accepting applications for new NCS's and Relay Stations. You do not need to be a member of the HWN to be a Relay Station. Finally NCS's do not have to be located near the Hurricane Warned area. You can be located anywhere in the USA and still be an NCS. In fact they prefer you to be out of the storm area if you are going to be an acting NCS.

    If you think you have what it takes, why not see if you can join up with the HWN? I'd consider it if I were retired.
     
    wedgar likes this.
  2. wedgar

    wedgar Administrator Staff Member Gold Member

    Excellent! Several years ago the Atlantic Division got our members in a webinar to discuss a hurricane coming up the coast and working on preparations for communications between the sections within the division prior to the hurricanes arrival.

    Worked so well, we've continued that practice.
     

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